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Database Management Tool

Whether you’re ordering an item online, booking an airline ticket, or liking a social media post, that activity will generate data that has to be stored in a database. As well as storing data, businesses need database management to run operations, optimize query performance, automate processes, and track inventory.

A database management system (DBMS) allows users to organize, store, retrieve, and optimize data via software with a management console. Key components of the system include operational data and metadata, documentation, database languages, a query processor, a runtime database manager, a database engine, and reporting. There are different types of DMBS tools, though they can be broken down into two main types:

1. Relational: Data appears as tables of rows and columns with a strict structure and clear dependencies. Since a Structured Query Language is the core of these systems, relational databases are also called SQL. They are useful for complex software solutions, but can face challenges when asked to scale.

2. Non-Relational: Non-structured data is collected in a single document instead of being organized into rows and columns, so this is considered a document-oriented system. Non-relational databases are also called NoSQL. They are a good option for startups or small organizations using Agile development.

Other types of DBMS include hierarchical databases and object-oriented databases.
Database Management Tools

What are Database Management Tools?

On the most basic level, database management tools provide a framework for organizations to store and process that data efficiently. They aim to control data throughout its entire lifecycle, providing a systematic and secure way to create, retrieve, update and manage data. Features of a database management tool might include application tuning, response time testing, and throughput testing.

When selecting a DBMS, these elements could impact your decision: data structure, licensing, scalability, cloud compatibility, data security, strength of documentation, learning curve, resource consumption, support for different data types, and reporting.

For an example, MySQL is a popular relational/SQL DBMS. It has a community edition that is free to use, with other commercial options with richer functionality. It is considered easy to use, with a simple syntax and gentle learning curve, and is available on leading cloud platforms like AWS. However, it was not built to scale and may not be suitable for large enterprises. See our tools section below for a more comprehensive comparison.

Benefits of Database Management Tools

From a high level perspective, database management tools help to manage application performance, increase compliance, and measure growth. They solve fundamental problems that have always plagued the storing, managing, accessing, and securing of user data while enabling fast and efficient collaboration between those same users.

Data integration, access, and auditing are all improved by implementing a DBMS. Due to DBMS qualities of abstraction and independence, organizations can upgrade storage and scale infrastructure without impacting day-to-day database operations. Having a single console to perform administrative tasks (instead of trying to collate spreadsheets and documents from various sources) makes it easier for database administrators to do their jobs.

Best Database management tools

  • MySQL

    MySQL

    MySQL is an open-source relational database management system (RDBMS) owned by Oracle. MySQL is compatible with nearly all operating systems and supports various storage engines, but it can be slow and has trouble with large data volumes. It is the de-facto solution for enterprises worldwide.

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  • mongodb

    MongoDB

    MongoDB is an open-source, non-relational (NoSQL) distributed database written in C++. It is document-based, which means that it stores data in rich JSON documents. The advantages of MongoDB, and of NoSQL in general are its dynamic schema, scalability, manageability, speed, and flexibility. It is a strong choice for businesses that are experiencing rapid growth, and is often applied for Node.js projects as well.

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  • Liquibase

    Liquibase

    Liquibase by Datical is an open source, database-independent library for tracking, managing and applying database schema changes. It provides a schema changelog that allows you to roll changes back and forward from a specific point.

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  • Redgate

    Redgate

    Redgate Software makes tools for professionals working on the Microsoft data platform. It produces specialized database management tools for Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL and Microsoft Azure. It also makes advanced developer tools for .NET Framework, such as SmartAssembly and .NET Reflector.

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  • Flyway

    Flyway

    Flyway by Boxfuse is an open source database migration tool. It prioritizes simplicity and is based around just 7 basic commands: Migrate, Clean, Info, Validate, Undo, Baseline and Repair. Migrations can be written in SQL or Java.

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  • DBmaestro

    DBmaestro

    DBmaestro is a DevOps for database solution provider. DBmaestro’s solutions enable organizations to run database deployments safely and methodically, increase development team productivity and expedite time-to-market. These solutions include release automation, version control, security and governance and business activity monitoring.

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